Research & Recognition

Cornell BME

King Lab, Dept. of BME, Cornell University

 

 

 

 

 

 

Abstract:
REDUCTION OF CIRCULATING TUMOR CELLS BY INDUCTION OF APOPTOSIS VIA A TRAIL-FUNCTIONALIZED, NANOSTRUCTURED SHUNT DEVICE

By Olivia H. Sheppard, Manlius Pebble Hill School, 5/2014

This study focused on advancing research in the capture of colon circulating tumor cells (CTCs), by engineering an implantable shunt device that will reduce metastatic burden by inducing apoptosis (programmed cell death) in CTCs. The shunt device was functionalized by a coating of the apoptosis-inducing molecule TRAIL and nanostructured via the use of halloysite nanotubes. The protein E-selectin, immobilized on the inner surface of the MicroRenathane shunt tubing, causes the cancer cells to adhere and roll on the surface. Through the cell rolling process, the surface of the cell is brought into repeated close contact with TRAIL. A colon cancer cell line designated COLO205 derived from a 70 year old male with Dukes’ stage D colon cancer was used for these experiments. Multiple trials were carried out to determine the effect of the halloysite nanotube coating on the viability of the processed cells. Each trial included a control, which was untreated with the TRAIL molecule and demonstrated the highest viability of processed cancer cells. The majority of the trials demonstrated that the addition of halloysite nanotubes altered the death rates of early apoptotic, late apoptotic, and necrotic cells thus proving that the experimental shunt device achieved the induction of apoptosis. This innovative design for a shunt device in capturing CTCs to aid in the reduction of metastatic burden could be used in conjunction with other chemotherapeutic colon cancer treatments to increase effectiveness.

Project Recognition – 2014 Central New York Science & Engineering Fair

  • Grand Prize, 2014 Intel ISEF Finalist
  • Senior Division, First Place
  • Medal, Highest Honors
  • Central NY Section of the American Chemical Society – 1st Place Award in Chemistry
  • SUNY Cortland Chemistry Award
  • Le Moyne College Scholarship Award

“King Lab researcher wins CNY Science and Engineering Fair” via
News & Events – Department of Biomedical Engineering – Cornell Engineering.

 

Maye Research Group, Dept. of Chemistry, Syracuse University

Maye Research Group, Dept. of Chemistry, Syracuse University

 

 

 

 

 

 

Abstract:
ALTERNATIVE ENERGY: USING NANOTECHNOLOGY TO TRANSFER ENERGY BETWEEN BIOLUMINESCENT FIREFLY PROTEINS & FLUORESCENT QUANTUM RODS

By Olivia H. Sheppard, Manlius Pebble Hill School, 5/2013

What appliance do you own that may be turned on and off without the requirement of an energy source? This study of nanotechnology investigates how a biological material—firefly luciferin—may be harnessed for both biological and non-biological use. Imagine one day possibly turning on a lamp without the need for batteries or electricity! The purpose of this research was to observe energy transfer between Photinus pyralis (Ppy) firefly luciferase protein and semi-conductive CdSe/CdS quantum rods. In variable trails, Ni ions were added to the solution being studied. During the addition of Ni ions, the protein absorbed the Ni and would not effectively bind to the quantum rod. Different measurements of protein and quantum rod were mixed with beetle luciferin and ATP to create one of the brightest bioluminescence systems in nature. The addition of Ni affected the BRET results in these trials. The binding of the protein to the quantum rod via a histag was supported and the fact that the luciferase has a significant influence on BRET was proven as well. An application of nanotechnology that is currently developing is the delivery of light to places in the body, specifically tumors for medical bioimaging. Medical use of Near Infrared Spectroscopy (NIR) is also being optimized through use of nanotechnology. The low background signals and lack of requirement of a direct excitation have proven these BRET nanosystems to be very useful for in vivo NIR imaging.

Project Recognition – 2013 Central New York Science & Engineering Fair

  • Grand Prize, 2013 Intel ISEF Finalist
  • 2013 Intel ISEF – Honorable Mention from the American Chemical Society
  • Senior Division, First Place
  • Medal, Highest Honors
  • Central NY Section of the American Chemical Society – 1st Place Award in Chemistry
  • U.S. Army Award for excellence in the areas of science and engineering
  • SUNY Genius Olympiad Finalist Award
    • Silver Medal Award
    • Top 5 Research Prize Award

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